"So Says Wynona"

Last year Dave Boone arrived in Seattle by way of Detroit, bringing with him a troubled mind and bruised singing voice—something like a Millennial Tom Waits with better elocution. So Says Wynona, his album of 21 spare, urban-rustic folk-blues songs recorded under the name Alberta, shines with dark, magnetic ambiance. --

JONATHAN ZWICKEL

"Alberta"

Alberta is not your typical blasé indie soundtrack. A relatively seasoned musician, his most recent project plays up a raw, unedited sound, mixing a folk/Americana vibe with chill yet quirky soundscapes to create a unique effect. The refreshing aspect of Alberta’s music, though, is his diversity of sound, which still maintains a common thread that makes his music his own. Artists like Alberta are a rare breed. The Rolling Stones, Nirvana, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez . . . all of the stars of years past got their start the way that artists such as Alberta are: by playing the music they love to play and welcoming those who want to hear it with open arms. --

CHARLOTTE HOLLEY

"street sounds"

This fucker just landed on my desk and it immediately lifted my spirits. I have been feeling slightly off all day, a bit tired and cold as the blustery part of December is starting to beat down on NYC, and Street Sounds felt like a nice warm shot of brandy and a electric blanket for my soul.  Alberta for all I know might be a monumental asshole who beats up red head charity cases for the Fuck of it, but I doubt it. The glow of his guitar and timber of his voice make me want to cuddle with him, his lady friend and their dog in the back of a jeep while counting shooting stars and shit.  

  

"Caves"

Alberta is like a nice glass of wine mixed with a bag of jolly ranchers. Sweet, sensual and vaguely dreamy. Take a mix of David Gray's voice, a batch of Sylvain Chauveau strings and mood, and the feeling of coming in from the cold. It is recipe for heavy breathing and easy evenings. Perfect for these dog days of winter, throw some warming liquor down your gullet, get some fleece underwear and your favorite lady or man friend and let the night unfold. Alberta's amazing ep Caves is the perfect soundtrack for such a night. Full of muted colors, goofy as Fuck smiles, fading sounds and a general sense of joyful and life fulfilling melancholy. Alberta's voice matched with those haunting guitars drills into your subconscious and opens up a gusher of all of those reflections, leaving you a weepy lump of joy and longing.Caves is a fucking gateway drug for nights spent wrapped up in blankets, eating pints of Ben and Jerry's, chased with boxed wine and watching Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind on a continuous loop. 

Through four songs of awesome, Caves digs deep, dropping all sorts of sticky fingers into your past. Plucking the right memories, adding them to your psychic mixtape and then jumping back into the stacks to look for that next perfect occurrence. shit "Street Sounds" alone can turn a grown man, with a granite facade, into a child who lost their favorite teddy bear. shit is hitting your emotional switches Eazy E style bro.

Alberta is perfect for subway listening, it feels like you are one dimensional onion layer removed from the rest of these assholes making their way to work. Caves drops you in the soup and lets you float around and simmer in its hearty perfection. 9/10. --

 

TIM BAKER

   

 

 

"It's A Viral Darling"

While clearly gifted with an unique melodic sense and instrumental dexterity, Alberta's greatest asset on It’s A Viral Darling is his voice. Alberta possesses a haunting, soulful tone, touched with fever and angst; it’s the perfect foil for the shimmering guitar in “American Splendor” and clangs loudly against the crooked melody and halting country twang in “Lake Affect.” Lazy, curled organ and sauntering drums swirl in the background against his sweet, syrupy singing in “Hesitations.” It’s a quirky, quixotic album that rewards curiosity. --

PATRICK CONLAN

"Alberta"

It’s refreshing and rewarding to hear unadulterated, unprocessed, and unfiltered musical expression, that which embodies true artistic merit even if it risks the unfortunate distinction of being too “alternative” in a homogenized music industry, ultimately to be forsaken by Corporate Headquarters. Michigan native Dave Boone, who goes by the moniker ALBERTA, is one such fearless artist who channels his musical spirit without apology, not content to maintain an even keel but rather to evoke spontaneous changes in a song’s shape and texture, releasing instrumental forays that explore the sonic wilderness, never failing to return in a timely fashion as though it may have been imagined.

 

"It's A Viral Darling"

Unhindered by any standard musical formula or template, Alberta‘s 2011 full-length release “It’s A Viral Darling” defies any comparison or resemblance to what’s traditionally known as Americana, Blues, Roots, or Folk Music. Instead each uniquely crafted song borrows from within those styles to create a purely original and natural sounding recipe, one that propels the listener on a seemingly endless musical adventure with twists and turns that feel as inspiring as they must have been to create. With vocals, guitar, and melody maneuvers often emanating the likenesses of Bob Dylan, The Doors, Elliott Smith and The Sadies, laced with wisps ofThe Flaming Lips, Brian Jonestown Massacre, and Nick Cave, you’re left with the feeling of having experienced something fulfilling in a way you haven’t felt before. It doesn’t mean you have to abandon all your guilty-pleasure, pop-music cravings, but often we forget that music is art, and it can be so much more than a regurgitated esthetic when in the hands of an Artist who’s boldly willing to create. Read More below about this singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist known as ALBERTA. --

JEFFREY BURNS

"It's A Viral Darling"

 

 Dave’s composition and songwriting combines elements of Neil Young, Bob Dylan, and Radiohead but at times I find myself lost [in the music] thinking about Creedence Clearwater Revival…With that said, these are all major players in the areas of rock, folk, and americana, but I am thinking about (and reminiscing about) these artists as I listen. I also can’t help but think about my Ethnomusicology professor, Dr. Leggett, who has a similar style to Dave’s. Alberta’s music is chill but it grooves. Dave’s vocals are soulful and they demand your attention while painting vivid pictures of the story being told. By the time you make it 90 seconds into track 3, you will catch my drift. When the organs kick in at 4 minutes, you’ll be in tone heaven. Then you will let the album play until the end simply because it makes you feel good. --                                           

 

           JOSHUA SMOTHERMAN

       

 

 

 

 

"Fucking brilliant...absolutley wonderful"--

NICK TANN

   

 

 

"I, II, III, IV, V"

 Alberta inhabits the burred, darkly beautiful fields of Americana, the vocals and electric guitars are equally gristly at times. Alberta's anti-folk style blends in a bit of gothic blues; some darker, meditative dirges are warmed by hearty vocals, humming organs and yowling lap steel; minimal at some points, epic at others. --

                                                                                                                                 JEFF MILO